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a jokesly washington event. are told. looks like a lot of comedy. >> anything wrong with that? really.ot i think the reference he was making was to andrea mitchell and alan greenspan's wedding that had been held around then. they are a power couple. andrea mitchell is a great journalist. alan greenspan is one of our most powerful economic minds in the last decade. it is an interesting dynamic when you have this crossover between friendship and social life. the president of the motion picture association told you he would never lobby. >> he did. i think what chris dodd is theemented in this book is impermanent feudal class, which is a term that tom coburn uses. it is used to describe the impermanent of washington. a lot of elected officials go on to become lobbyists and consultants. frankly, life is pretty good inside the belt. >> let's watch this. >> "this town." >> mark leibovitch. >> "this town." >> d.c. is described as inflated by big-money. a humanor schumer -- ladle in the local soap celebration buffet. wow, mark. all kinds of reaction. taking down the preening egos of this town. the
of reaction. >> they are taking down the preening egos of this town. the washington post. >> i hear there is no index. we cannot find out what is going on in this work. >> this book was so widely anticipated in washington as a screaming indictment. >> washington has created a bootleg index. >> your colleague suggested the notion of the composition -- >> everyone is talking about the book. everybody thinks they are in it. >> why are people that you wrote about so happy about this book? >> beats me. what is interesting, a lot of what you are seeing there was done before we saw the book. the speculation took on a life of its own. look. it is nice to have a book the bull are talking about, and obviously what happens is people focus on who is up, who is down, what news has broken. ultimately -- i do know what people to miss the more serious point. washington is doing very, very well in a very gilded age in some ways while the rest of the country is suffering. >> any reaction you have had to the book, surprising? >> not really. look, when you write a book, a lot can go wrong. that is the
centered on peace commemorating the 50t 50th anniversary of martin luther king's march on washington. is there any way we could be firing rockets at syria before he delivers that speech? >> i seriously doubt that number one for the optics, number two, the u.n. in texters are on the ground. we expect the administration to release a case publicly that gets away from the circumstance case that you and i are talking about and present a more factual case, specific examples of how the assad regime went forward with this. that's what we're expecting. i don't expect this to happen today while the president is speaking, although it is a much anticipated speech, the 50t 50th affords of the "i have a dream" speech that culminated with the march on washington 50 years ago. >> thank you so much, live from washington. >> the iranian stream leader says intervention in syria by the u.s. would be a "disaster." david jackson is on the ground in lebanon. thank you for joining us. what's the reaction in the middle east to the supreme leader's statement this morning? >> morgan, across the board, it's all
now, it just looked like a very friendly almost clubby washington event. jokes are told that looked like a lot of comedy. that's what i saw. >> anything wrong with that? >> no, not really. >> talking -- i think the reference they were making was andrea mitchell and al greenspan's wedding that had been held around then. look, they're a power couple. andrea mitchell is a great journalist and alan greenspan is one of the most powerful economic minds and forces in the last few decades. 's an interesting dynamic. had the crossover in the friendship between professional and social life and so forth. >> you write in there for instance, chris dodd, a senator then, now works for the professional picture association he wouldn't lobby. >> he did. now he's head of the most powerful lobbying organizations in washington. what it's emblem mattic of was this fuel class. it sort of described the permanence of washington, the fact that people come here -- they almost always say now a lot of elected officials go on to become lobbyists and consultants and frank is good inside the beltway. >> here's som
in washington. it was an absolute shock. >> this week on "inside washington" -- the shocker, "the washington post" sold. another victim of the changing media universe. >> i do not subscribe to anything anymore. i read everything online. >> president obama cancels a summit with vladimir putin. >> there have been times they slide back into cold war thinking. >> a terror threat closes u.s. embassies. >> this group is fairly ingenious, bold and eager to cause damage. >> the president targets fannie mae and freddie mac. also, hillary, the documentary, the miniseries, and reince priebus, the angry chairman. >> i will not expose our candidates to this kind of treatment. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> the name of the program is "inside washington" and if there is a bigger story in washington than the sale of "the washington post," i cannot think of one. we have colby king, lois romano, a "the washington post" veteran. charles krauthammer.part of the "washington post" writers group. i came to washington to work for broadcast properties, which were owned by "the w
. thatth the announcement "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bezos, we thought we would take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. we want to introduce you to alan mutter. insulting,spaper lecturer at the university of california-berkeley on media consultant, lecturer at the university of california-berkeley on media economics. also joining us from our new york studio is edmund lee, the media reporter for bloomberg news. mr. lee, if we could start with you. how big a deal is this sale? in secularig deal terms, at least. in terms of numbers and finance, $250 million is not a lot of money. compared to other media deals, it is pretty small. it is more the fact that it is "the washington post," the storied newspaper. and jeff bezos, on the other side of the country, who is a well-known internet billionaire. despite the fact that he tends to be press shy. it is the secular interest of the big names behind it. interest in this deal outside of washington and out
. great discussion. >>> the billionaire founder of amazon buys "the washington post." how did bezos change the news business? that debate's next. ezos change the news business? that's coming up next. "the wash post. how did bezos change the news business? that's coming up next. " how did bezos change the news business? that's coming up next. my dna...s me. it helps make me who i am every piece is important... it's like a self-portrait this part.. makes my eyes blue... so that's why the sun makes me sneeze... i might have an increased risk of heart disease... arthritis gallstones hemochromatosis i'll look into that stuff we might pass onto to our kids... foods i might want to avoid... hundreds of things about my health... getting my 23andme results it really opened my eyes... the more you know about your dna the more you know about yourself... i do things a little differently now... eat better... ask more questions change what you can, manage what you can't i always wondered what my dna said about me... me... me. now i know. know more about your health. go to 23andme.com and order your dna
. ♪ >>> welcome back to a special edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington: the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton continuing our special coverage live from the lincoln memorial on the national mall. 50 years ago, the eyes of the nation were on this spot where hundreds of thousands of people converged on history. people of all races from all walks of life joining hands in the name of justice and civil rights. in this hour, we'll hear from some of the people who traveled so far to attend this march. including the young girl shown in this iconic photo. i'll talk to her now 50 years later about how the march changed her life. we also have my interview with congressman john lewis from the steps of lincoln memorial where he spoke a half a century ago. i'm honored to begin the second hour of our show tonight with bernie a. king, ceo of the king center. thank you for being here today. >> thank you. glad to be here. >> you head the king center where your mother founded many years ago. and you have struggled and worked to keep the legacy of your mother and father alive. an
por espionaje... miles de estudiantes universitarios regresaran a clases en washington, pero recibiran un duro golpe en su economia.. y es que segun un informe, el costo para estacionarse en los planteles incrementara consideradamente... claudia uceda nos tiene los detalles.. daniel empieza su vida universitaria en la capital y aun no sabe si necesitara un auto. daniel aizenman/estudiante universitario " aun no tengo un plan, podria considerarlo." estos padres ya dejaron a su hijo en los dormitorios del campus de american university, ellos son conscientes que su hijo tendra que tomar decisiones. samuel aizenman/padre de daniel "me imagino que es el quien va a tener que lidiar con este costo. sabra si va a tener que tener carro, una bicicleta o nada ..." futuro que le puede costar muy caro a muchos estudiantes que llegan a la capital... ya que de acuerdo con la triple a los costos de los permisos para estacionar vehiculos en universidades han aumentado en algunos casos como un 80 porciento jeanette tejada/portavoz aaa "el estacionamiento es muy limitado y caro en washington dc..." el es
shocker. the washington post company sells its number and publishing assets to amazon.com founder. the deal capped the day of big news in print, online and in television. >> looser lending. new reports say banks are lowering standards for businesses, consumer and home buyers. does it signal a return to the bad old days of too easy credit? >> home grown, walmart pledges to buy american made goods. how it could affect manufacturing. we kick off a special series called made in america. >> it was a stunning late day capper today to a day of major news affecting the newspapers you read, the websites you visit, the tv networks you watch, and the cable systems you may subscribe to. amazon.com founder and ceo is buying the publishing business of the washington post company. which includes the fames newspaper for $250 million. the post long run by members of the eugene meyer and graham families reached the peak of its fame for tough reporting, during the watergate era. baso says, i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c., and our nation, and the post's values will n
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
to their center-right readers. and we'll see if jeff bezos can change that with his new "washington post." another week, another so-called major speech from president obama. he says he's ending fannie mae and freddie mac. but i see at least one if not two new government insurance plans. is anything really changing here besides rhetoric? and as the time warner/cbs blackout continues here's the big question. will this speed up the demise of the cable tv model? more and more americans are looking into cutting that cord. all those stories and much more coming up in "the kudlow report," beginning right now. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." first up tonight, a major shake-up at two of the country's most influential newspapers. after four generations of family ownership the "washington post" is selling to amazon ceo jeff bezos. this coming on the heels of the "new york times" fire sale of the "boston globe," unloading the paper to red sox owner john henry for seven cents on the dollar. so what do the "washington post," "the new york times," "the boston globe," an
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
for the washington measures i'm the person on that and for the drug purchasing proponent argument no one will be listed on that because we're not moving forward on the family friendly ordinance. let me see if there are are any thoughts on that increase seeing none, can i see a motion >> without objection it passes. and then on the undertook lying motion as amended can we do that same house, same call. without objection the motion is approved as amended >> madam clerk please read the memorials. >> on behalf of the supervisor campos for the late ms. alicia kerry. >> i want to thank you. this is the last board meeting before our august recess and i hope that everyone has a good recess and i want to thank the public and want to take a moment for sfgovtv and for the staff. and what that any more business for the committee >> no, that includes our business. >> with that madam clerk and everyone that includes our test test, test, test, test, test, test, test okay i'd like to call this meeting to order. hello. good afternoon, everyone thank you so much for coming to disaster council
$250 million for "the washington post." 1% of his personal fortune. as our jim accosta reports, billionaires have gone shopping in america's newsrooms. >> watergate brought down a president. >> have to get something on paper. >> but it made a newspaper. a triumph not just for reporters, bob woodward and carl bernstein but also for the family that owned "the washington post" lead by it's publisher kathryn graham now the legacy in the future of one of the most important newspapers rest in the hands of one billionaire, amazon found jeff b bezos. gives new meaning to the term -- >> just follow the money. >> the "post" now follows other major newspapers. "the wall street journal" bought by murdoch and "the boston globe." >> i think what people are forgetting when we're talking about billionaires taking over the media, that's not exactly new. >> william randolph everyoherst how wealth -- >> i expect to lose a million dollars next year. you know, at the rate of a million dollars a year i'll have to close this place in 60 years. >> something bezos has in common. remaking the selling th
think about the march on washington they only think about the dream speech and that part of the speech. they don't think about anything else and you are right. he said a lot harsher things than anyone talked about. this is including the absence of women on the stage on purpose. they even missed the dream part of the speech. they were looking so much for the violence that they did not see it. i'm wondering how they thought, with anyen there, notice that they've missed the story. >> i want to address media coverage on the march on washington and i remember the three major networks were there. withoutered it interruption and they broadcasted it to europe. "the washington post" assign more than 60 reporters to cover that story. it was really big news. a congressman, you said that the civil rights movement without the media would be like a bird without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the livi
of the washington post. good to see you. >> good to see you. how's it going? >> good. why do you think jeff bezos was interested in "the post" especially since he acquired it rather than amazon buying it. >> i think it would be difficult for the company to buy it. they're doing so many different experiments that are costly. jeff is someone who's putting off profits for a lot of growth. i think that would have pushed investors over the edge if the company itself bought it. >> that makes sense. do you think with his ecommerce experience he can reinvent the newspaper the way he reinvented publishing? >> i'm not so sure. i don't think they'll sell kindless from the washington post. i think he has ideas about circulation and distributing the paper that he knows about very well. >> what's interesting to me is five or six years ago rupert mourdock acquired "the wall street journal" for $5 billion and here we are five years later, bezos is paying $250 million for the washington post. that's a real fire sale. >> yeah, or else rupert mourdock paid too much. what's happened in the last five years, you think
on a dime. >> three to one, john. >>> issue 2. bezos goes postal. sold, the washington post, by a billionaire, jeff bezos. the founder of amazon.com. price? $250 million out of bezos's own pocket. the washington post newspapers has been owned by the same family, the grahams, for eight decade. the post is loss known for its reportage of the watergate break-in that led to the resignation of richard nixon. this was the golden age for the post. but now, in the digital age, with news content gravitating to the internet, the post has struggled, like all print media. donald graham described how revenues declined. seven years in a row, with the newspaper suffering a $54 million operating loss last year. that's $54 million. circulation of the paid print edition plunged from $786,000 in 2002, eleven years ago, to $481,000 in 2012. rather than attempt more cost cutting, says mr. graham, he decided to sell. mr. bezos, age 49, is one of the world's richest people, with an estimated worth billions. he sells streaming video online over amazon prime and he introduced the amazon kindle. bezo
detained. one writer for "the washington post" was told by a police officer that if he saw her again, he would shoot her in the leg. look, at the end of the day, egypt is not a country that is known for being particularly friendly towards the media, especially the western media. >> well, we are so glad that you're safe. stay safe and thank you for joining us. >>> we'd like to turn to rajiv chandrasekaran, senior correspondent and cairo reporter for "the washington post" and in new york, sherif mansour, middle east and north african program coordinator for the committee to protect journalists. rajiv, this is so disturbing, this video. you have been bureau chief for "the washington post," you've covered the iraq war. do you feel that journalists are being specifically targeted now in a way that they were not before? >> well, i think there's a degree of immunity, if you will, that no longer cloaks journalists. some might accuse me of looking at the past with rose-tinted glasses, but a generation or so ago, particularly in the middle east, you would see journalists driving around in cars wit
of dictator throwing thunder bolts out of the sky in washington. he's not. this is a federal system and that means the states are involved. and that's as it should be. and i think more power to him -- or more kudos to had him for wanting to do it that way. some states are participating in the health care markets. some are not. the feds will do it if the states don't. on immigration, there's a role for the states and i think it is going to be an ecpabded role for the states in any kind of reform. on health care, the interesting thing to me is that the business -- a lot of the business community wants obama care to go through. by business community, i mean hospitals, insurers, health care networks, they want more customers. so they went to this republican red state governor and said, you know what? this is pro business. be for it. and she was. >> i think to howard's point, the notion that no good deed goes unpunished. jan brewer is expanding the medical roles which i think is a very good move. there's very little that i think jan brewer does that's good. this is a good thing. low-inco
. >> announcer: from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> straight to the breaking news. a heavy security presence in cairo, egypt, this morning as military rulers are trying to strengthen their control over a country descending into chaos. so, how much worse will it get in egypt? hundreds are dead, nearly 40 christian churches have been torched and looted, and supporters of the ousted president morsi, the muslim brotherhood, are vowing to fight back. we'll have a live report coming up from cairo in just a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in lig
a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in light of recent actions, we tried to give some time to the administration. they obviously tried to get the military government to not crack down in a violent way, to restore democracy, to move to elections, to release political prisoners. they have ignored all of those requests. and now with the recent violent crackdown, i do not see how we can continue aid. i believe it must be suspended because, unfortunately, i think the military's gotten the impression, and particularly with what the president not asking for aid to be suspended when he spoke this week, that whateve
on the washington debate. thank you both very much for your time this morning. >> thank you. >> let me bring in richard engel, our chief foreign correspondent, on the ground in cairo, as well as senior fellow at the woodrow wilson center, robin wright, an expert on the broader middle east for context here. richard, your reporting has been compelling from the chaotic streets of cairo. given your sense of things, where is this headed? >> reporter: well, i think a lot of it depends on what happens in washington. and just to continue on the debate you were just having, people in this country and around the region think it would be an absolutely disastrous idea for the united states to cut off aid, that washington has real interests with the egyptian military, preferential access to the suez canal, military overflights, and not to mention the camp david accords. the camp david accords brokered by the united states, the peace agreement between israel and egypt, says in principle that u.s. aid should be commensurate between israel, from washington to israel and from washington to egypt. and does th
but is it just a ploy to sell books? >>> should marijuana be decriminalized. it is in washington state. >>> and i'm abby huntsman. how do people feel about men and women in power, like their bosses? we'll report how men and women see men and women in power on "the cycle" on august 19th, 2013. ♪ >>> shout out to carol king. we begin with egypt as america focuses on that $1.5 billion in aid we give egypt each year. more than 800 people are confirmed dead since wednesday. that number is expected to go higher. adding the potential for more unrest is this. hosni mubarak might be released while awaiting trial. over the weekend, 25 off-duty egyptian policemen were executed in an ambush. also, 36 prisoners were killed while in custody. there are varying accounts as to what happened there. we're going to take a two-pronged approach. first, the international implications and then the domestic, political side of it here in america. for that we have two people who know. former white house mideast adviser, ambassador mark ginsburg. for the politics of it all, dana millbank. first to you, am
, jeff bezos is buying "the washington post" for $250 million. bezos, one of the captains of the online world and future of commerce, putting a quarter of a billion dollars of his own money, not amazon money, into a newspaper that is well over 100 years old and part after model that everyone thinks is dieing. we don't have a whole lot of details a letter gone out from the publisher i believe of "the washington post." two employees telling them about the deal. let's remember that newspapers, which used to have really rich margins and still are profitable but have been really hurt by the internet, are becoming an investment for the very rich. ron burkle, the billionaire, pathmark billionaire and david geffen were in buying "the l.a. times." carlos slim, from mexico, one of the world's richest men, rescued "the new york times." jeff bezos of amazon, getting ready to pay for the newspaper itself. many people thought "the washington post" company, most valuable asset inside the company is not the legendary newspaper that led to the watergate investigation that led to resignation of nixon in
on washington? >> the purpose of it was jobs. but what was behind that and what was the revelation for me was how much and everything dr. king did was really all about education. was all about education. he was locked in on that and when that group went into the white house and talked with the president, president kennedy said and this is reported by brandt, that the kind of influence you have in the black community you really ought to emphasize schools and getting your kids to do well in schools. >> i am struck mostly by how different things are now. the technology is such a you can get a flash mob to show up if you want but 1963 you get 200,000 people back to the mall and you would be below horned. organizing was remarkable and that to me -- i would like people to understand the enormity of that. >> a very short time a group of people came together because they believe in something. and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> on the march on washington to go forward but the young people who want to be journalists tuesday that they have an obligation to cov
the broadcast the washington post reports the national security agency has broken privacy rules or overstepped its legal authority thousands of times each year since it was given broad new spy powers by congress in 2008. in a separate post story, the leader of the secret court that supposed to oversee the spy program says its ability to do so is limited and that it must trust the government to report when it improperly spies on americans. we will have more on the story with alexander abdo after the headlines. reuters is reporting edward snowden began downloading documents related to widespread u.s. spying while working for dell last april, almost a year earlier than has previously been reported breed prior stories have focused on snow and subsequent three-month stint with contractor booz allen hamilton holding. snowden said that people associate with his father have, in his words, misled journalists into printing false claims about my situation. snowden said neither his father nor his father's lawyer nor his lawyer's wife and spokesperson represent him in any way. in lebanon, a car bomb tore t
other neighborhood and musical events we host and the chief and i were in washington, d.c. in concert with all if you have provided in those events inform put forth our need for federal support. we're going to continue that effort it's hard in this era sequestration. and i think the public and visitor to our city deserve sa. ao as a result of board president chiu and in constant conversation with our d e m along with the police and fire chief we want to signal to you to make sure our radio systems are updated right away our system is 13 years old a he if you're already on your cell phone you're on the third ongoing years of the changing. we need this up grating we've learned that communication is the first thing we depend upon. and our emergency facilities are necessarily and we'll outline a specific timeframe for that to happen. we're already working on radio systems and the ata and the agencies want to be connected the police and fire and the emergency responders have to have a radio system we can depend on that about so next week we have the gone gate exercise and we're ready for t
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. and martin luther king jr.'s march on washington. and martin luther king jr.'s historic speech on civil rights. captioning funded by cbs good morning. good to be with you. the obama administration is gearing up for military action against syria, possibly within days. as early as today the u.s. could release an intelligence report directly linking the assad regime to chemical weapons attack against syrian civilians. defense secretary chuck hagel says u.s. forces are ready, and the white house says the goal of the military strike is not regime change. alfonso is live with more. good morning, alfonso. >> in fact, united nations inspectors are back on the search for evidence of a poisonous gas attack outside the syrian capital this morning. at the same time there are four u.s. navy destroyers in position m mediterranean, and they're within range of syrian targets. >> reporter: rebels that may get a boost from western air strikes any day now. washington is rallying international support for action against the assad regime for its alleged
of converging -- thousands are converging on the nation's capital to reenact the famous march on washington. tomorrow marks the 50th anniversary. we sat down with one family who wrote the bus to d.c. on that day in 1963. chambers still remember's the song she sang 50 years ago. ♪ songs that served as the soundtrack of her experience and thousands of others on the march on washington. ♪ oh freedom she kept her music sheet and plenty of other memorabilia. like his organizing manual featuring the event lineup. and other icons of the civil rights movement. she made sure she had her front seat. >> i was standing down from where the speaker was. i was so tickled because it could look right up and see him. he was eloquent. he was not pushy. it was a tremendous experience because like you say there was a certain tension because of what could happen. there was such track quality and peace you could not believe it. >> hannah was only 30 when she heard dr. king speak your -- her e. one and herfeeling family to witness that pivotal moment. -- not the only one in her family to witness that pivotal m
canceled his meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that is all next on "washington journal." ♪ is sunday,orning, it august 11 come up 20 13. it is today, resident obama began his week long vacation at martha's vineyard. today we will be discussing the state of u.s. relations with dive intoking a deep u.s. job numbers, and talking about recent al qaeda threats. before we do that we want to hear about the state of news media from our viewers. the pew research center's -- you research center released its biannual data and while there is still plenty of criticism about the industry, most americans continue to believe the media plays an important watchdog role. as we take you through that reports this morning, we want to hear your thoughts. he of us a call. we split our lineup -- we split our lines up by age group. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media sites, on twitter and facebook. you can also e-mail us at .ww.c-span.org we want to take you to that report that was released on thursday by the pew research center for the people. public valuations
/11. after the bell stunner, jeff bezos buys "the washington post" for $250 bucks. and the bankrupt city of detroit starts the process of putting its priceless museum artwork up for auction. you wouldn't believe how much it could be worth. all those stories and much more coming up on the "kudlow report" right now. good evening, i'm larry kudlow. this is the "kudlow report." first up tonight, breaking news, jeff bezos paying $250 million for "the washington post" newspaper. a few days ago boston red sox owner john henry bought the "boston globe" for the bargain basement price of only $70 million. what is going on here? why will these foes succeed while others have failed. joining us is our own julia boorstin. why will they succeed where others have failed in. >> i think the question is how do you define success? one thing jeff bezos makes very clear in his letter about this and it was also in the press release is that he's not investing this just as a financial endeavor but he sees this as supporting journalism. he says "i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c. an
of the billionaire newspaper owner's club when he scooped up the "washington post" for a cool quarter billion dollars. he joins a growing list which includes among others . . . and so who cares? newspapers are dying anyway, right? not so fast, a 2009 report showed that not only do 75% of adults still read newspapers, but local and online news overwhelmingly originates from traditional papers like the "washington post." so most americans newspaper still originates there. the idea that newspapers have been marginalized and replaced by the internet is a total fallacy. they have the kind of power that charles foster cane dreamed of. >> people will think -- >> what i tell them to think. >> david: and alex wrote today . . . jeff bezos is a man who can afford that kind of influence. the purchase price of a quarter billion dollars is less than 1% of his $28 billion net worth. so is he just bored, a rich guy buying a new toy? his company is definitely politically engaged. under his leadership, amazon has vigorously opposed anti-just legislation. they have also lobbies for lower taxes and the company was until
that changed america forever. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. people of all races, regular people from all walks of life marching against injustice, marching to change history. a day when the voices of the movement echoed across america. >> we are of a massive moral revolution. >> how long can we be patient? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to action and a call for peace. the words that inspired a people, a nation, and the entire world. >> free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. >> tonight, a special two-hour edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington. the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. 50 years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am. right now watching history. millions more watching at home seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement, call for justice and equality. powerful speeches and powerful music from singers like lahalia jackson, bob dylan. tonight we'll hear those voices. we'll also hear from congressman john lewis. i talk t
comments from the ambassador there. the washington side from you if we stop giving aid to egypt, then, yes, vladimir putin might come in. then we lose a key ally or change a key ally in that important region. so what has washington got to consider here? >> well, the ambassador was talking about how it all is naval gazing. that, of course, is the great national past time here in the capital. i've just left today's white house briefing that was dominated by that very question of what will happen to that aid. as you would expect, they're making no commitment one way or the other. found many ways to deflect that over the hour. the good news, perhaps, is that congress is still out of session for another few weeks, so no decision actually needs to be made. they won't be forcing anybody's hand. they can wait and see how things develop here. there was no appetite for suspending aid before this most recent crackdown, as we saw on the hill before they left town. obviously, this could change. it seems to me that the administration is saying, all right, we've got a little breathing room, not in terms
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